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MUS 311 Music History and Literature I: Citing Your Sources

Course guide for Dr. Werner's Music History and Literature class

Key Ideas-- Ideas that change everything.

Information has Value: 

Whatever information product or source you are using, please remember that  a lot of factors contributed to the creation of the resource. The creator invested time, original thought and no doubt many other resources to create that product. Consequently, it is crucial  to give appropriate credit to the creator (s) of that product. (source: ACRL standards)

Why You Need to Cite Sources

Thank you to NCSU Libraries for the use of this video. Credits: A. Burke, D. Dorafshar, K. Langdon, A. Orphanides, K. Duckett. This video is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial -ShareAlike 3.0 United States license.

Citation Help by Style

Words to Know

BIbliography:  A list of works that share something in common, for example, an author, topic, or time period. In a scholarly work, an author places a bibliography  at the end to detail the resources used in the creation of the work. It can also include sources on the topic that were not used by the author. 

Citation: A written reference to an author or work, identifying where the source of an idea(s).

Plagiarism: "The act of using another person's words or ideas without giving credit to that person."*

"Works Cited" (page): An alphabetized list of all the resources an author used in a given paper. It is the page placed at the end of a paper written in MLA style. 

"References" (page): An alphabetized list of all the resources an author used in a given paper. It is page placed at the end of a paper written in APA style. 

Quote: A selection of words, written or oral, that were taken verbatim, completely, from another source.

Paraphrase: A selction of ideas, written or oral, that were taken from another source with some variation. 

Source: Online Dictionary for Library and Information Science

*source: www.merriam-webster.com

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